Archive for the ‘Home Economics’ Category

The day after…Healthy Weight Week

January 23, 2011

Today is January 23rd. The first day after Healthy Weight Week was celebrated in the USA (January 16-22).

For several years now, I have been following this special week with great interest. Initiated by Francie M. Berg (editor of the Healthy Weight Journal), the idea is to celebrate interventions which promote a healthy weight and a healthy body image; and also to name and shame  the past year’s worst weightloss diets, products and claims. The latter is done on ‘Rid the World of Fad Diets and Gimmicks Day.’

One reason I named this entry ‘The day after’ is that many consumers are often  lured into trying out weightloss diets and different products, only to realise very soon that these do not work. Clever marketing strategies highlight the ‘benefits’ and ‘special properties’ of these  diets or products, often quoting the science imprecisely or inadequately to argue their point. In the long-term, many of these weightloss diets and products  prove to be useless or occasionally even harmful. It is also well known that one of the outcomes of society’s and the media’s overemphasis on weight, as reflected in appearance, is disordered eating.

Weightloss, where this is truly needed, is no easy task. In many cases, however,  small and gradual lifestyle changes are enough to set one on the right track. Eating a variety of foods,  with an emphasis on low-energy (i.e. low calorie) but  nutrient-dense (i.e. rich in nutrients) foods, accompanied by a good amount of physical activity is the basic  formula. This clearly points to increasing plant food intake (vegetables, fruits, pulses, wholegrain cereals) and opting for low fat milk and milk-products, lean meat and low calorie beverages (e.g. water). It also points to choosing low fat cooking methods, such as steaming, grilling, and stir-frying, and making physical activity a regular feature in ones daily/weekly routine.

Two sets of awards are highlighted during Healthy Weight Week. These are the ‘Healthy Body Image Awards’ aimed at prevention of disturbed eating, body dissatisfaction and eating disorders; and the ‘Slim Chance Awards’ aimed at exposing the fad diets, gimmicks and false promotions.

 The ‘Healthy Body Image Awards’ winners for 2010 were:

‘A Chance to Heal’: a multi-workshop programme for middle and high school students, adults and families, and the health care community focusing primarily on  dissonance (http://achancetoheal.org)

‘In Favor of Myself’: an innovative 8-session preventive programme to promote positive self and body image widely disseminated among youth in Israel;

‘Healthy Body Image’: a 4th through 6th grade curriculum emphasising positive body image, appreciation of inner strengths, resistance to marketing pressures among others (http://www.bodyimagehealth.org )

 – ‘Body Rocks’: a school and community peer education club focusing on positive body image and eating disorders prevention.

This year’s finalists in the ‘Slim Chance Awards’ were:

Lapex BCS Lipo Laser, using laser light treatment for spot reduction (worst gimmick);

– HCG, a pregnancy-related hormone placed under the tongue to mobilise fat (worst product);

– Ultimate Cleanse, that builds on a myth re the need to detoxify the body (worst claim);

Basic Research, a marketer of bogus products with a long history of Federal Trade Commission (US) violations, warnings, charges and fines (most outrageous).

One must realise that due to global marketing and internet shopping, many  products like those mentioned above are available and accessible worldwide. Therefore, as Home Economics educators or other educators promoting healthy eating and a healthy weight we need to help our students / clients to be more consumer savvy. We also need to teach the basic principles of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.

For more on Healthy Weight Week and research and information on obesity, eating disorders, weight loss and healthy living at any size see http://www.healthyweight.net/hww.htm

For a 22-year history of Slim Chance fads and frauds see www.healthyweight.net/fraud.htm

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Cooking skills for children – A ‘real’ need

June 14, 2010

A while ago, Jamie Oliver (known for his school food revolution) won an Award in the USA for promoting the need for food education.  In his words, food education includes learning how to cook.

I could not agree more. Cooking skills are essential for children – teaching them how to make tasty, healthy foods quickly is teaching them a skill necessary for life. Parents and adults need to realise their role in teaching their children how to cook. So do schools. To quote Jamie: “Under the circumstances, it’s profoundly important that every single [American] child leaves school knowing how to cook 10 recipes that will save their life. Life skills.”  I strongly feel this applies to Maltese children too. And we were nearly there once….

Home Economics has been around as a school subject in Malta for decades. Thousands of students have benefitted from a Home Economics education. Healthy and economical cooking has always been integral to this school subject. Home Economics students have enjoyed cooking. Home Economics students have learnt from cooking.

BUT UP TILL THIS DAY NOT ALL MALTESE STUDENTS HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO DO HOME ECONOMICS IN SCHOOL.

It’s time we worked on this again in Malta. Now.

A few years ago the local education authorities committed themselves to ensuring a food and nutrition education entitlement for all students to help them towards healthier living. (see HELP document p.15 http://www.youth.gov.mt/ministry/doc/pdf/HELP_document.pdf) I agree that this is easier said then done. I also acknowledge that several initiatives are already under way. But we need to accelerate the process for the good of our children.

Take a look at the video of Jamie Oliver’s award acceptance speech. (http://www.ted.com/talks/jamie_oliver.html)  It is truly an eye-opener. Please see the video right till the end. Hear his final wish. Take what is applicable to you and whether you are a  mum, dad, teacher, student, school administrator or food producer help in bringing back what’s been lost: The family and the school teaching cooking skills to the younger generation.

Bring back Home Economics Education

May 21, 2010

On May 11, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association
(JAMA) published an article recommending that Home Economics (HE) Education should be brought back as a compulsory subject in US schools. 

The rationale given by the authors (Alice H. Lichtenstein and David S. Ludwig) was that the younger generations are growing up with no healthy and thrifty food and meal preparation  skills and that HE education could help overcome this deficiency and thus  help curb rising obesity figures.

The article lays emphasis on the need to teach students about the
scientific and practical aspects of food – basic cooking techniques;
caloric requirements; sources of food (from farm to fork); food shopping and budgeting principles; food safety; sourcing and using nutrient information and labels; and effects of food on well-being and risk for chronic disease.

I feel that this list of topics is typical of a classic Home Economics curriculum, though the article does say that these topics may be  taught in a cross curricular manner.

Below are the introductory and concluding sentences of the article.

“Home Economics, otherwise known as domestic education, was a fixture in secondary schools through the 1960s, at least for girls. The underlying concept was that future homemakers should be educated in the care and feeding of their families. This idea now seems quaint, but in the midst of a pediatric obesity epidemic and concerns about the poor diet quality of adolescents in  the United States, instruction in basic food preparation and meal planning skills needs to be part of any long-term solution.” (Lichtenstein & Ludwig, 2010, p. 1857)

“Obesity presently costs society almost $150 billion annually in increased health care expenditures. The personal and economic toll of this epidemic will only increase as this  generation of adolescents develops weight-related complications such as type 2 diabetes earlier in life than ever  before. From this perspective, providing a mandatory food preparation curriculum to students throughout the country may be among the best investments society could make.” (Lichtenstein & Ludwig, 2010, p. 1858)

This article serves as further evidence of the need for a period of compulsory HE education, for both male and female students, during the formal years of schooling.

Access article here:  http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/303/18/1857

Nutritional supplements

May 15, 2010

This morning the Times (Malta) published an article about where and who should be allowed to sell nutritional supplements. The current law states that “food supplements may only be dispensed by a pharmacist, doctor or a person with other suitable qualifications as may be laid down by the Food Safety Commission.”

(See http://www.doi.gov.mt/EN/press_releases/2010/05/pr0870e.asp)

The local Food Safety Commission is organising a training course for retailers in Health Food and similar stores to better understand the products they sell. Those who successfully attend for this course may then be approved by the Food Safety Commission to also be allowed to sell  food supplements. (For further details on this course call:  23952000.)

In Home Economics we teach that if a person is in good health and eats a  variety of foods from the different food groups they should be meeting their nutritional needs. However, we also teach that there are times during the lifecycle when a person may need to boost their nutritional intake for a while, or they may need to make up for deficiencies.

It is key that consumers make informed choices when seeking to use nutritional supplements. It is advisable not to buy supplements over the counter without knowing a little bit about the science of nutrition and how nutritional  supplements can interact with nutrients and healthy substances found naturally in food, or even with medication.

Here is the link to the Times article where I was also quoted.

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20100515/local/only-trained-people-can-sell-food-supplements

Unfortunately, there is a slight imprecision in the last sentence. I had said that fat-soluble vitamins, such as A and D, are stored in the body and that excess can be harmful. They misquoted me slightly here.

Easter – Food for Thought

April 3, 2010

Once a Rising Star, Chef Now Feeds Hungry

http://edition.cnn.com/2010/LIVING/04/01/cnnheroes.krishnan.hunger/

On reading the above story I truly felt that as wives, husbands, mothers, fathers, sons,  daughters, brothers, sisters, educators or  Home Economists we should make every effort to make the best use of our food supply.

When there are festa days, such as Easter, we often prepare food in abundance…Admittedly,  it is in our culture to show happiness and affection through food (and why not?), but are we making sure that there is minimal waste possible?  

In our own family lives and when we are teaching in different settings, let’s seriously think and talk about the quantity of food prepared, how to store and make good use of leftovers, and even how to use the food peelings and scraps for composting.

L-Ghid it-Tajjeb!

(Happy Easter!)

Winning Video on Childhood Obesity

April 3, 2010

‘Childhood Obesity: A Challenge Facing America’ is a video produced by a Home Economics student in Hawaii. It just won first prize in a national US competition.

See the video here:

 http://studentcam.viddler.com/videos/watch.php?id=9932b996

Though the environment and context are slightly different from Malta, I feel this video could be a useful tool to use in our Home Economics classrooms (or in any educational setting with teenagers) when talking about being healthy, factors which influence our health status, food choices, level of physical activity and diet-related diseases.

I also feel, however, that when we are ‘teaching’ we should  not dwell too much on ‘body weight’;  but rather our focus should be on giving practical tips, offering encouragement and facilitating making the right choices to eat healthily and to be physically fit, as individuals and as family members.

Welcome to my blog!

March 5, 2010

Hi! I am a Maltese Health, Nutrition and Consumer educator… having trained as a Home Economist, health promoter and food sociologist.  I believe food is one of the greatest pleasures in life and that healthy eating should be enjoyable, memorable, sustainably sourced (as much as possible)… and well… healthy of course. Food is very much about us. Who we are and what we stand for. Visit my blog for regular updates and provocative questions about food, health and consumption, as well as other interesting and juicy tidbits. (Excuse the pun!)

Suzanne